anitzu

ileftmyheartintokyo:

Tokyo Geisha with an Uchiwa 1911 by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Uchiwa (round fans) were introduced to Japan from China many centuries ago. They are made by stretching paper or silk, often decorated with calligraphy or ukiyo-e (floating world) scenes, over a radiating bamboo skeleton. Uchiwa is a kigo (seasonal word) for summer in Japanese poetry.

ileftmyheartintokyo:

Tokyo Geisha with an Uchiwa 1911 by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Uchiwa (round fans) were introduced to Japan from China many centuries ago. They are made by stretching paper or silk, often decorated with calligraphy or ukiyo-e (floating world) scenes, over a radiating bamboo skeleton. Uchiwa is a kigo (seasonal word) for summer in Japanese poetry.

(via bibidebabideboo)

— 3 months ago with 149 notes
1910-again:

Odilon Redon, Yellow Tree Against a Yellow Background, 1901

1910-again:

Odilon Redon, Yellow Tree Against a Yellow Background, 1901

(via bibidebabideboo)

— 4 months ago with 1401 notes
malformalady:

The Waitomo Glowworm Caves attraction is a cave at Waitomo on the North Island of New Zealand, known for its population of glowworms, Arachnocampa luminosa. This species is found exclusively in New Zealand. A glowworm uses its glow to attract food and to burn off its waste. It’s tail glows because of bioluminescence, which is a reaction between the chemicals given off by the glowworm and the oxygen in the air. This chemical reaction produces light, which the glowworm can control by reducing the oxygen to the light organ. Insects fly towards the light and get stuck in the sticky lines that the glowworm hangs down to catch food. Glowworms also use their glow to put other creatures off eating them.

malformalady:

The Waitomo Glowworm Caves attraction is a cave at Waitomo on the North Island of New Zealand, known for its population of glowworms, Arachnocampa luminosa. This species is found exclusively in New Zealand. A glowworm uses its glow to attract food and to burn off its waste. It’s tail glows because of bioluminescence, which is a reaction between the chemicals given off by the glowworm and the oxygen in the air. This chemical reaction produces light, which the glowworm can control by reducing the oxygen to the light organ. Insects fly towards the light and get stuck in the sticky lines that the glowworm hangs down to catch food. Glowworms also use their glow to put other creatures off eating them.

(via mygarden)

— 4 months ago with 563 notes
kiyo:

Kambhorn & Vestrahorn - Iceland (by Nonac_eos)

kiyo:

Kambhorn & Vestrahorn - Iceland (by Nonac_eos)

(via mygarden)

— 4 months ago with 5160 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Fabian Burgy

1. Smoke

2. Fissure 1

3. Bursting Wall

4. Skid Marks

5. Black is Coming

6. Displaced Nature

7. Paint Blast

8. Fissure 2

(via bibidebabideboo)

— 5 months ago with 2364 notes